“Go to Your Email”

Posted on Apr 7, 2015 in UI/UX, UX Breakdown
“Go to Your Email”

I recently began reading “Microinteractions: Designing with Details” by Dan Saffer. The book, in short, explains how designing a product is all in the details. I noticed more and more the microinteractions I would come across on a daily basis and began to take note which experiences I enjoyed and which ones left me feeling like “I Just Can’t Take it Anymore!”

“The difference between a product you love and a product you tolerate is often the microinteractions you have with it.”

One of my least favorite microinteractions comes from Outlook. If an organizer of a weekly event updates an event you get a notification. This makes total sense, however, if I want to respond to this updated “meeting” I have to respond to the original invitation. Now, if this event has been going on for weeks and weeks I have no idea when the first invitation came. It’s buried somewhere in the recesses of Outlook-land never to be seen again. Also, what a waste of time trying to find it. Next to this notification should be a button that says something along the lines of, “See Original Invite,” or, “Hey! I don’t want to waste your valuable time so I’ll help you find it.” As a user I feel lost after getting this notification. It’s a dead end with no way out.

 

One microinteraction that made me feel like I was a valued customer came from Travelzoo. I was wanting to book a vacation but I had unfortunately forgotten my password. So I typed in my email so they could send a reset link to me. The next screen I was greeted with was an awesome experience. First they let me know that they sent the email. And second (which is my favorite part), is a button that says, “Go to Your Email.” You mean to tell me I don’t have to open another tab and type in the url to my email account all by myself? Yes. I clicked the button and to my surprise it magically knew where to guide in the grid. Satisfaction.

Kudos to you, Travelzoo.

 

travel_zoo

 

All this to say is the details do matter. The thought process that goes into the smallest of microinteractions in a product or experience can make or break the customer’s journey.

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